Search for: smallpox

1 The Adventist Home, p. 393.4 (Ellen Gould White)

Counsel to One in Debt—Be determined never to incur another debt. Deny yourself a thousand things rather than run in debt. This has been the curse of your life, getting into debt. Avoid it as you would the smallpox.

2 Counsels for the Church, p. 155.7 (Ellen Gould White)

Be determined never to incur another debt. Deny yourself a thousand things rather than run in debt. This has been the curse of your life, getting into debt. Avoid it as you would the smallpox.

3 Counsels on Stewardship, p. 257.1 (Ellen Gould White)

Be determined never to incur another debt. Deny yourself a thousand things rather than run in debt. This has been the curse of your life, getting into debt. Avoid it as you would the smallpox.

4 Selected Messages Book 2, p. 303.3 (Ellen Gould White)

Vaccination—[Vaccination for Smallpox: D. E. Robinson, one of Mrs. White's secretaries, under date of June 12, 1931, wrote as follows concerning Mrs. White's attitude toward vaccination:

5 Selected Messages Book 2, p. 303.6 (Ellen Gould White)

... recognized the fact that it has been proven that vaccination either renders one immune from smallpox or greatly lightens its effects if one does come down with it. She also recognized ...

6 Homeward Bound, p. 209.4 (Ellen Gould White)

Be determined never to incur another debt. Deny yourself a thousand things rather than run in debt. This has been the curse of your life, getting into debt. Avoid it as you would the smallpox.

7 Manuscript Releases, vol. 14 [Nos. 1081-1135], p. 267.4 (Ellen Gould White)

Then we passed through the same at Battle Creek, and darkness of Marian's death. She has been with me in my work for 25 years. She was appointed of God to help me, and we have been united to bring before the people a grand amount of precious truth. How I shall miss her as my helper! I left immediately after her burial to journey to Los Angeles and to this place. I do keep you in my mind much. I do not want you to take smallpox patients. You hold on until I write again, which will be soon.

8 The Ellen G. White Letters and Manuscripts: Volume 1, p. 644.1 (Ellen Gould White)

... noble boy named Joseph, about four years old. Buried her husband with that dreadful disease, smallpox. Then buried a daughter, a young woman grown. Gave birth soon after to a pair ...

9 Letters and Manuscripts — Volume 1 (1844 - 1868), Ms 7, 1859, par. 37

... noble boy named Joseph, about four years old. Buried her husband with that dreadful disease, smallpox. Then buried a daughter, a young woman grown. Gave birth soon after to a pair ...

10 Letters and Manuscripts — Volume 3 (1876 - 1882), Lt 4, 1877, par. 3

... been the curse of your life, getting into debt. Avoid it as you would the smallpox.

11 Letters and Manuscripts — Volume 7 (1891-1892), Lt 52, 1892, par. 5

... any time to repent and seek pardon of their sins, contagious diseases in fevers, cholera, smallpox, and various ills to which humanity is subject. Plagues are in our world and the ...

12 Letters and Manuscripts — Volume 12 (1897), Lt 171, 1897, par. 3

... last Sabbath. She went off the boat to Brother Daniells’ place, but it was ascertained smallpox was on board, therefore she with others was brought back to the boat and all ...

13 Letters and Manuscripts — Volume 12 (1897), Lt 187, 1897, par. 4

... and physicians came on board and inspected more closely and say there are cases of smallpox. So the passengers, twenty of them who had left, were searched up and had to ...

14 Letters and Manuscripts — Volume 18 (1903), Lt 94, 1903, par. 14

... . Her sickness was found to be what is called manilla itch, a mild form of smallpox. This is the disease that Ella and Mabel had while we were in the East ...

15 Letters and Manuscripts — Volume 19 (1904), Lt 191, 1904, par. 4

I have just had a call from your father. He gave me a copy of a letter he has written you. Mabel, in no case enter a smallpox hospital. I do not think that either you or Ella ought to take up the work of treating the sick. You are both too sensitive to suffering.

16 Letters and Manuscripts — Volume 19 (1904), Lt 394, 1904, par. 5

Then we passed through the same at Battle Creek, and darkness of Marian’s death. She has been with me in my work for 25 years. She was appointed of God to help me, and we have been united to bring before the people a grand amount of precious truth. How I shall miss her as my helper! I left immediately after her burial to journey to Los Angeles and to this place. I do keep you in my mind much. I do not want you to take smallpox patients. You hold on until I write again, which will be soon.

17 Ellen G. White: The Early Years: 1827-1862 (vol. 1), p. 395.1 (Arthur Lacey White)

As attested by many of the entries in the little 1859 diary and by frequent obituaries in the Review, these were times of great ignorance in health matters and in combating disease. Tuberculosis, bilious fever (appendicitis), typhoid fever, smallpox, and malaria were often listed as diseases that took the lives of many—particularly children, teenagers, and those in their 20s.

18 Ellen G. White: The Australian Years: 1891-1900 (vol. 4), p. 294.1 (Arthur Lacey White)

... in quarantine for three weeks on shipboard in Melbourne because one passenger came down with smallpox just on the ship's arrival. The wedding finally took place at the Health Home ...

19 Over My Shoulder, p. 98.2 (Ella May White Robinson)

She took a second look. “It must be smallpox!” she exclaimed, backing away. The doctor who was called confirmed her diagnosis. He had read in the newspaper that there were three hundred cases of smallpox in Napa. I was placed in quarantine, and Mabel and cousin, May, were shut up with me because they also had been exposed.

20 Over My Shoulder, p. 98.4 (Ella May White Robinson)

Our confidence in the smallpox diagnosis was somewhat weakened when we learned that the epidemic in Napa had been so light that it was called “Manila fever.” Not until years later, when repeated vaccinations failed to affect either Mabel or me, was the smallpox diagnosis confirmed. Ever afterward we were able to care for genuine smallpox patients without fear of contracting the disease.