The Review and Herald

1855/1902

August 13, 1914

The Physician in Chief

[Manuscript dated December 22, 1908, published recently, with similar matter, in the pamphlet entitled “The Spirit pf Sacrifice.”]

EGW

Precious light has been given me concerning our sanitarium workers. These workers are to stand in moral dignity before God. Physicians make a mistake when they confine themselves exclusively to the routine of sanitarium work, because they consider their presence essential to the welfare of the institution. Every physician should see the necessity of exerting all the influence the Lord has given him in as wide a sphere as possible; he is required to let his light shine before men, that they may see his good works, and glorify the Father who is in heaven. RH August 13, 1914, par. 1

The head physicians in our sanitariums are not to exclude themselves from the work of speaking the truth to others. Their light is not to be hidden under a bushel, but placed where it can benefit believers and unbelievers. The Saviour said of his representatives: “Ye are the salt of the earth: but if the salt have lost his savor, wherewith shall it be salted? it is thenceforth good for nothing, but to be cast out, and to be trodden underfoot of men. Ye are the light of the world. A city that is set on an hill cannot be hid. Neither do men light a candle, and put it under a bushel, but on a candlestick; and it giveth light unto all that are in the house. Let your light so shine before men, that they may see your works, and glorify your Father which is in heaven.” This is a work that is strangely neglected, and because of this neglect, souls will be lost. Wake up, my brethren, wake up! RH August 13, 1914, par. 2

Our leading physicians do not glorify God when they confine their talents and their influence to one institution. It is their privilege to show to the world that health reformers carry a decided influence for righteousness and truth. They should make themselves known outside of the institutions where they labor. It is their duty to give the light to all whom they can possibly reach. While the sanitarium may be their special field of labor, yet there are other places of importance that need their influence. To physicians the instruction is given: Let your light shine forth among men. Let every talent be used to meet unbelievers with wise counsel and instruction. If our Christian physicians will consider that there must be no daubing with untempered mortar, and will learn to handle wisely the subjects of Bible truth, seeking to present its importance on every possible occasion, much prejudice will be broken down, and souls will be reached. RH August 13, 1914, par. 3

I have been shown that Dr. ----- is being too closely confined to the sanitarium work at -----. He should be given opportunity to let his influence be more widely felt.... We are not to be an obscure church, but we are to let the light shine forth, that the world may receive it. “I will rejoice in Jerusalem, and joy in my people,” God declares through his servant Isaiah. These words will be proved true when those who are capable of standing in positions of responsibility let the light shine forth. Our leading physicians have a work to do outside the compass of our own people. Their influence is not to be limited. Christ's methods of labor are to become their methods, and they are to learn to practice the teachings of his Word. Every one who stands at the head of an institution is under sacred obligation to God to show forth the light of present truth in increasingly bright rays in every place where opportunity offers. RH August 13, 1914, par. 4

The workers in our sanitariums are not to think that the prosperity of the institution depends upon the influence of the head physician alone. There should be in every institution men and women who will exert a righteous, refining influence, and who are capable of carrying responsibilities. The chief responsibilities should be shared by several workers, in order that the leading physician may not be confined too closely to his practice. He should be given opportunity to go where there is need of words of counsel and encouragement to be spoken. As a representative of the Chief Physician, now in the heavenly courts, he is to speak to new congregations, to broaden his experience. He needs to be constantly receiving new ideas, constantly imparting of his store of knowledge, constantly receiving from the Source of all wisdom. We need ever to keep ourselves in a position where we can receive increased light, have new and deeper thoughts, and obtain clearer views of the close relation that must exist between God and his people. And we obtain these views and these ideas by association with those to whom we are called to speak words of mercy and pardoning grace. RH August 13, 1914, par. 5

In all our work there should be kept in view the value of the exchange of talents. Strenuous efforts are to be put forth to reach souls and win them to the truth. We are required to make known the principles of health reform in the large gatherings of our people at our camp meetings. A variety of gifts is needed on these occasions, not only for the work of speaking before those not of our faith, but to instruct our own people how to work in order to secure the best success. Let our physicians learn how to take part in this work,—a work by which they give to the world bright rays of light. RH August 13, 1914, par. 6