The Review and Herald

1787/1902

February 27, 1913

Having Faith in God

EGW

We must have faith in God. “He that cometh to God must believe that he is, and that he is a rewarder of them that diligently seek him.” Our faith is to be tried by trials and temptations, that patience may have her perfect work and we may be perfect, wanting nothing. We know nothing about the strength of our faith until it is tried. You may not understand the way in which God is leading you, you may not be filled with joy, but may be in heaviness because of temptation; but in all this it is your privilege to say, “I believe the Lord will give me the things I have asked for. I can and will trust God.” When you have done this, be thankful, knowing that the trying of your faith worketh patience. Do not become restless, full of faultfinding, under the test and proving of God. Do not fret and talk discouragement and grieve the Holy Spirit of God from you. That which you sow, you will reap; and you will not find that a harvest of doubt is a pleasant thing to reap. You must be careful what kind of seed you sow, for it will bear a harvest after its kind. Talk light and faith and hope, and educate yourself to see light when God reveals it to you. RH February 27, 1913, par. 1

“But let patience have her perfect work, that ye may be perfect and entire, wanting nothing.” If you feel that you lack wisdom in this, plead the promise of God. He says, “If any of you lack wisdom, let him ask of God, that giveth to all men liberally, and upbraideth not; and it shall be given him. But let him ask in faith, nothing wavering.” Come to God with all your needs. Don't go to others with your trials and temptations; God alone can help you. If you fulfil the conditions of God's promises, the promises will be fulfilled to you. If your mind is stayed upon God, you will not go from a state of ecstasy to the valley of despondency when trial and temptation come upon you. You will not talk doubt and gloom to others. You will not say, “I do not know about this or that. I do not feel happy. I am not sure that we have the truth.” You will not do this, for you will have an anchor to the soul both sure and steadfast. When we talk discouragement and gloom, Satan listens with fiendish joy; for it pleases him to know that he has brought you into his bondage. Satan can not read our thoughts, but he can see our actions, hear our words; and from his long knowledge of the human family, he can shape his temptations to take advantage of our weak points of character. And how often do we let him into the secret of how he may obtain the victory over us. O, that we might control our words and actions! How strong we would become if our words were of such an order that we would not be ashamed to meet the record of them in the day of judgment. How different will they appear in the day of God from what they seem when we utter them. RH February 27, 1913, par. 2

What harm is wrought in the family circle by the utterance of impatient words; for the impatient utterance of one leads another to retort in the same spirit and manner. Then come words of retaliation, words of self-justification, and it is by such words that a heavy, galling yoke is manufactured for your neck; for all these bitter words will come back in a baleful harvest to your soul. Those who indulge in such language will experience shame, loss of self-respect, loss of self-confidence, and will have bitter remorse and regret that they allowed themselves to lose self-control and speak in this way. How much better would it be if words of this character were never spoken. How much better to have the oil of grace in the heart, to be able to pass by all provocation, and bear all things with Christlike meekness and forbearance. RH February 27, 1913, par. 3

Home religion is greatly needed, and our words in the home should be of a right character, or our testimonies in the church will amount to nothing. Unless you manifest meekness, kindness, and courtesy in your home, your religion will be in vain. If there were more genuine home religion, there would be more power in the church. We may have a great deal more faith than we now have, by living up to the light God has given. Says the apostle, “Now faith is the substance of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen.” As you would believe in a friend, so you are to trust God. If your friend has never denied your requests, you will not doubt his promise to favor you in some new desire. You are to believe that Jesus knows just what you need, and will supply all your wants; so you can go on in faith, saying, “I have laid my burden upon the Lord, and I will not lay it upon any human being. God will hear and answer my prayers.” Satan may say, “You do not feel any better, you are just as miserable as ever.” But tell him you believe that God will do just as he has said, and rest your whole weight on his promise. RH February 27, 1913, par. 4

We must have a practical faith, a faith which works by love and purifies the soul. This genuine faith has a purifying, refining influence upon the Christian's character. Those who have this faith will not be careless and rough in word or deportment. They will realize that they are of value in the sight of God, his sons and daughters, and they will be circumspect in deportment, careful in habits and dress. They will realize that they are a spectacle unto men and angels, and will feel the necessity of having a pure mind, of speaking choice words, and acting in a refined manner. They will keep before them the fact that they are preparing for the society of the heavenly angels. RH February 27, 1913, par. 5

Brethren and sisters, do not let every one know your thoughts and emotions. Do not manifest impatience; keep yourself under control, master yourself. Satan will take advantage if you give him the least chance. You must fight the good fight of faith, and lay hold on eternal life. You may gain one victory, but this is not enough; you must gain victory after victory, going from strength to strength. We are to occupy some place in the Lord's spiritual temple, and the important question is not as to whether you are a large or small stone, but whether you have submitted yourself to God that he may polish you, and make you emit light for his glory. If we are in the Lord's temple, we must emit light. Are we permitting the heavenly Builder to hew, square, and polish us? Have we faith to rest in him? RH February 27, 1913, par. 6

We must have a faith that is not dwarfed and sickly, but one in keeping with the great truth committed to us. O let us come up to the help of the Lord, to the help of the Lord against the mighty! We have a truth that will sanctify the soul, if we will only allow it to work in us and make us holy. Shall we be sanctified through the truth? May God help us to let his grace and light into our souls. RH February 27, 1913, par. 7