The Review and Herald

1569/1902

November 5, 1908

Filled with the Fulness of God

EGW

The themes of redemption are momentous themes, and only those who are spiritually minded can discern their depth and significance. It is our safety, our joy, to dwell upon the truths of the plan of salvation. Faith and prayer are necessary in order that we may behold the deep things of God. RH November 5, 1908, par. 1

Our minds are so bound about by narrow ideas that we catch but limited views of the experience it is our privilege to have. How little do we comprehend what is meant by the apostle Paul when he says, “For this cause I bow my knees unto the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, ... that he would grant you, according to the riches of his glory, to be strengthened with might by his Spirit in the inner man.” Why is it that many who profess to have faith in Christ have no strength to stand against the temptations of the enemy?—It is because they are not strengthened with might by his Spirit in the inner man. The apostle prays “that ye, being rooted and grounded in love, may be able to comprehend with all saints what is the breadth, and length, and depth, and height; and to know the love of Christ, which passeth knowledge, that ye might be filled with all the fulness of God.” If we had this experience, we should know something of the cross of Calvary. We would know what it means to be partakers with Christ in his sufferings. The love of Christ would constrain us, and though we would not be able to explain how the love of Christ warmed our hearts, we would manifest his love in fervent devotion to his cause. RH November 5, 1908, par. 2

Paul opens before the Ephesian church, in the most comprehensive language, the marvelous power and knowledge they might possess as sons and daughters of the Most High. It was theirs “to be strengthened with all might by his Spirit in the inner man,” to be “rooted and grounded in love,” to “comprehend with all saints what is the breadth, and length, and depth, and height; and to know the love of Christ, which passeth knowledge.” But the prayer of the apostle reaches the climax of privilege when he prays that “ye might be filled with all the fulness of God.” RH November 5, 1908, par. 3

Here are revealed the heights of attainment that we may reach through faith in the promises of our Heavenly Father, when we fulfil his requirements. Through the merits of Christ, we have access to the throne of infinite power. “He that spared not his own Son, but delivered him up for us all, how shall he not with him also freely give us all things?” The Father gave his Spirit without measure to his Son, and we also may partake of its fulness. Jesus says: “If ye then, being evil, know how to give good gifts unto your children: how much more shall your Heavenly Father give the Holy Spirit to them that ask him?” RH November 5, 1908, par. 4

The Lord appeared of old to Abraham, and said, “I am thy shield, and thy exceeding great reward.” This is the reward of all who follow Christ. Jehovah Emmanuel—he in whom are hid all the treasures of wisdom and knowledge—to be brought into sympathy with him, to possess him, as the heart opens more and more to receive his attributes; to know his love and power, to possess the unsearchable riches of Christ to comprehend more and more “what is the length, and breadth, and depth, and height; and to know the love of Christ, which passeth knowledge, that ye might be filled with all the fulness of God.”—this is the heritage of the servants of the Lord, and “their righteousness is of me, saith the Lord.” RH November 5, 1908, par. 5

The heart that has once tasted of the love of Christ, cries out continually for a deeper draft; and as you impart, you will receive in richer and more abundant measure. Every revelation of God to the soul increases the capacity to know and to love. The continual cry of the heart is, More of thee, and ever the Spirit's answer is, Much more; for our God delights to do “exceeding abundantly above all that we ask or think.” To Jesus, who emptied himself for the salvation of lost humanity, the Holy Spirit was given without measure. So it will be given to every follower of Christ when the whole heart is surrendered for his indwelling. Our Lord himself has given the command, “Be filled with the Spirit,” and this command is also a promise of its fulfilment. It was the good pleasure of the Father that in Christ should “all the fulness dwell;” and “in him ye are made full.” RH November 5, 1908, par. 6

The life of Christ was a life charged with a divine message of the love of God, and he longed intensely to impart this love to others in rich measure. Compassion beamed from his countenance, and his conduct was characterized by grace and humility, love and truth. Every member of his church militant must manifest the same qualities, if he would join the church triumphant. The love of Christ is so broad, so full of glory, that in comparison to it, everything that man esteems so great dwindles into insignificance. When we obtain a view of it, we exclaim, O the depth of the riches of the love that God bestowed upon men in the gift of his only begotten Son! RH November 5, 1908, par. 7

When we seek for appropriate language in which to describe the love of God, we find words too tame, too weak, too far beneath the theme, and we lay down our pen and say, “No, it can not be described.” We can only say, with the beloved disciple, “Behold, what manner of love the Father hath bestowed upon us, that we should be called the sons of God.” It is the mystery of God in the flesh, God in Christ, divinity in humanity. Christ bowed down in unparalleled humility, that in his exaltation to the throne of God he might also exalt those who believe in him to a seat with him upon his throne. RH November 5, 1908, par. 8

To all who are willing for self to be humbled are given God's promises: RH November 5, 1908, par. 9

“I will make all my goodness pass before thee, and will proclaim the name of Jehovah before thee.” RH November 5, 1908, par. 10

“Call upon me, and I will answer thee, and show thee great and mighty things, which thou knowest not.” RH November 5, 1908, par. 11

“Exceeding abundantly above all that we ask or think,” will be given unto us “the Spirit of wisdom and revelation in the knowledge of him,” that we may be able to “comprehend with all saints what is the breadth, and length, and depth, and height; and to know the love of Christ, which passeth knowledge,” that we may be “filled with all the fulness of God.” RH November 5, 1908, par. 12

“Eye hath not seen, nor ear heard, neither have entered into the heart of man, the things that God hath prepared for them that love him.” Only through his Word can a knowledge of these things be gained; and even this affords but a partial revelation. But there every power will be developed, every capability increased. The grandest enterprises will be carried forward, and the highest ambitions realized. And still there will arise new heights to surmount, new wonders to admire, new truths to comprehend, fresh objects to call forth the powers of body and mind and soul. All the treasures of the universe will be open to the study of God's children. With unutterable delight we shall enter into the joys and the wisdom of unfallen beings. We shall share the treasures gained through ages and ages spent in contemplation of God's handiwork. And the years of eternity, as they roll, will continue to bring more glorious revelations. “Exceeding abundantly above all that we ask or think,” will be, forever and ever, the impartation of the gifts of God. RH November 5, 1908, par. 13