The Review and Herald

1507/1902

October 10, 1907

Beneficence

(Concluded.)

EGW

The Needs of a Mission Field

For many years, the Lord has been keeping before his people the needs of the work among the colored people in the Southern States of America. The moral darkness of this field is, in itself, a powerful plea for the exercise of liberality. In the past, some have done what they could to support this branch of our work; and their beneficence has borne fruit in the conversion of many souls. RH October 10, 1907, par. 1

Although much remains to be done for the colored people, we have cause for rejoicing over the good beginning that has been made. In a recent number of The Gospel Herald it is reported that “fifteen years ago there were not over twenty colored Seventh-day Adventists south of Mason and Dixon's line; but today there are seven hundred. Twelve years ago there was only one colored Seventh-day Adventist church; today there are fifty, not counting those in Africa and the West Indies.... The tithes of the colored people last year in the United States amounted to five thousand dollars; fifteen years ago it was not over fifty dollars.” RH October 10, 1907, par. 2

Let us thank God, dear brethren and sisters, and take courage! God is laying bare his arm to do a mighty work in this mission field within the borders of our own land. He is now giving his people an opportunity to extend the message rapidly in the South, by revealing a spirit of beneficence at the time the yearly offering for the support of the colored work is taken up, the first Sabbath in October. God has reposed confidence in us by making us stewards of means and of his rich grace; and he now points us to the poor and suffering and oppressed, to souls bound in chains of superstition and error, and assures us that if we do good to these, he will accept the deed as though done to himself. “Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren,” he declares, “ye have done it unto me.” RH October 10, 1907, par. 3

The poor are not excluded from the privilege of giving. They, as well as the wealthy, may act a part in this work. The lesson that Christ gave in regard to the widow's two mites, shows us that the smallest willing offerings of the poor, if given from a heart of love, are as acceptable as the largest donations of the rich. In the balances of the sanctuary, the gifts of the poor, made from love to Christ, are not estimated according to the amount given, but according to the love which prompts the sacrifice. RH October 10, 1907, par. 4

Thousands of colored people in the South may now be uplifted, and become human agents to help their own race, if they can receive the help God is calling upon us to give them. Multitudes of men and women in this field feel their deep poverty and necessity of elevation. And when faithful teachers shall come in to open to them the Scriptures just as they read, presenting truth in its native purity, the darkness will disappear. Bright beams of light will shine upon the soul searching for truth. And with those who have had advantages, a close and intelligent investigation will take place upon the subjects of truth revealed in the Scriptures. Many will be taught of God. They will learn aright from the Great Teacher, and will accept with joy the truths that will sanctify and uplift. The moral image of God will be restored in the soul, and many will be eternally saved. RH October 10, 1907, par. 5

My dear brethren and sisters, Christ is now saying to you, Lift up your eyes and look on this Southern field; for it needs workers—sowers of the seed, and reapers. It needs your means for the maintenance of these workers. The grace of Christ is unlimited, it is God's free gift. Then why should not this neglected people have some hope and courage and faith brought into their lives? There is sunshine in the heart for all who will accept Christ. RH October 10, 1907, par. 6

Sharing in the Joys of the Redeemed

There is reward for the whole-hearted, unselfish workers who enter this field, and also for those who contribute willingly for their support. Those engaged in active service in the field, and those who give of their means to sustain these workers, will share the reward of the faithful. RH October 10, 1907, par. 7

Every wise steward of the means entrusted to him, will enter into the joy of his Lord. What is this joy?—“Likewise, I say unto you, there is joy in the presence of the angels of God over one sinner that repenteth.” There will be a blessed commendation, a holy benediction, on the faithful winners of souls. They will join the rejoicing ones in heaven, who shout the harvest home. How great will be the joy when the redeemed of the Lord shall all meet,—gathered into the mansions prepared for them! O, what rejoicing for all who have been impartial, unselfish laborers together with God in carrying forward his work in the earth! What satisfaction will every reaper have, when the clear, musical voice of Jesus shall be heard, saying, “Come, ye blessed of my Father, inherit the kingdom prepared for you from the foundation of the world.” “Enter thou into the joy of thy Lord.” RH October 10, 1907, par. 8

The Redeemer is glorified because he has not died in vain. With glad, rejoicing hearts, those who have been co-laborers with God see of the travail of their soul for perishing, dying sinners, and are satisfied. The anxious hours they have spent, the perplexing circumstances they have had to meet, the sorrow of heart because some refused to see and receive the things which make for their peace, are forgotten. The self-denial they have practised in order to support the work, is remembered no more. As they look upon the souls they sought to win to Jesus, and see them saved, eternally saved—monuments of God's mercy and of a Redeemer's love—there ring through the arches of heaven shouts of praise and thanksgiving. RH October 10, 1907, par. 9

“And they sang a new song, saying, Thou art worthy; ... for thou wast slain, and hast redeemed us to God by thy blood out of every kindred, and tongue, and people, and nation; and hast made us unto our God kings and priests: and we shall reign on the earth. And I beheld, and I heard the voice of many angels round about the throne and the beasts and the elders: and the number of them was ten thousand times ten thousand, and thousands of thousands; saying with a loud voice, Worthy is the Lamb that was slain to receive power, and riches, and wisdom, and strength, and honor, and glory, and blessing. And every creature which is in heaven, and on the earth, and under the earth, and such as are in the sea, and all that are in them, heard I saying, Blessing, and honor, and glory, and power, be unto him that sitteth upon the throne, and unto the Lamb forever and ever.” RH October 10, 1907, par. 10

“They that be wise shall shine as the brightness of the firmament; and they that turn many to righteousness as the stars forever and ever.” RH October 10, 1907, par. 11