Lt 228, 1899

1899

Lt 228, 1899

Haskell, S. N.

“Sunnyside,” Cooranbong, New South Wales, Australia

May 11, 1899

Previously unpublished.

Dear Brother Haskell:

Your telegram came yesterday afternoon. I have thought the matter over, and cannot possibly leave my work and workers. We are called upon for advice and for the adjusting of the workers, finding places for them where they can be boarded and where they can room, and be kept in the best possible good feeling and spirit to do the work. But this is only one little item. Colcord has had to go to Sydney to have a tooth fixed. Elder Daniells is there now. There is not the least need of me, and I think they have all the preaching that will do them any good. Lt228-1899.1

But aside from all this, I must attend to my work. The cold is still upon me, but I am improving. But it is not that that would hinder my going. I am pressed with burdens that none can do but myself. I am to use my pen, and keep a clear, well-balanced mind to do the work on hand. I cannot leave this work for another to do, for it would not be done. I want every jot of strength and power now to cast out the net and draw in [the] fishes it may take. I speak next Sunday at Martinsville in the grassy paddock, then can come directly home; and that without confusion will be no tax. They need me here, and I am not needed in Sydney. The boat will be in from Auckland next Monday. It was at Auckland Tuesday night. That brings another mail for me to read, and answer letters. Lt228-1899.2

I feel no special burden for Sydney now, but I do feel a burden that souls nigh shall have the words of truth and efforts be made to bring them in. Cooranbong and stations between here and Cooranbong must be visited, and the truth must be preached. They have as yet had scarcely any labor. We must now work as we have never done before. I ask you to look at the fields just within reach of our arms, to see and understand their necessity. This must go to the mail. Lt228-1899.3

In haste. Lt228-1899