A Place Called Oakwood

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Appendix

A. Oakwood Categories

With few exceptions, Ellen White's statements about Oakwood fit into seven categories: Admonition, Condition, Instruction, Providence, Purpose, Support, and Vision. PCO 148.1

1 Admonition:The appeals Ellen White made to the students and workers of Oakwood to be spiritual, evangelize the world and personally develop. PCO 148.2

2 Condition:Mrs. White's portrayal of Oakwood at the time she wrote. PCO 148.3

3 Instruction:The heavenly directives Ellen White conveyed about the leadership of the school, its operation, the content of the curriculum, and other matters. PCO 148.4

4 Providence:The God-ordained beginnings of Oakwood Ellen White spoke of so often. PCO 148.5

5 Purpose:God's object for Oakwood in the context of Christian education. PCO 148.6

6 Support:Ellen White's almost constant plea for financial, spiritual and missionary support for the fledgling institution. PCO 148.7

7 Vision:The picture Ellen White painted of Oakwood's providential purpose and divine destiny. PCO 148.8

Admonition

Students, there is something for every one of you to do in God's service. The Lord wants you to be His helping hand in reaching souls in many places. He wants you to have an intelligence so sharp and clear that you can grasp the most precious truths, and in the simplicity of Christ present these truths to those who have never heard them. There is great need for colored workers to labor for their own people. You can labor in many places where others cannot. White workers can labor for the colored people in some places. This is why we have established our printing office in Nashville. In and near Nashville there are large institutions for the education of the colored people. The men who established these institutions have opened the way for the light of the gospel to go to the colored people. PCO 149.1

Sources: The Southern Missionary, June 1, 1904; Manuscript Releases 6:211-212; Ms 60, 1904; Manuscript Releases 4:25

Every one before me is to be a missionary for Christ. Students, we want you to bring others to this school. And we want you to do your level best yourselves in gaining a fitness for service. You have precious opportunities here, and we want you to learn how to train the minds and hands of others, so that they in turn can lead still others to Christ, and receive a crown of rejoicing. You are to be patient, kind, gentle, and yet firm and strong for the right. You are to place your feet on the platform of eternal truth, the platform that no storm or tempest can sweep away. Do you ask what this platform is? It is the law of God. He says that if you will love the Lord Jesus, and keep His commandments, you will be a kingdom of priests, heirs of God and joint heirs with Christ. PCO 149.2

Sources: The Southern Missionary, June 1, 1904; Ms 60, 1904

All that is done by those connected with the Huntsville School, whether they be teachers or students, is to be done with the realization that this is the Lord's institution, in which the students are to be taught how to cultivate the land, and how to labor for the uplifting of their own people. They are to work with such earnestness and perseverance that the farm will bear testimony to the world, to angels, and to men, regarding the fidelity with which this gift of land has been cared for. This is the Lord's farm, and it is to bear fruit to His glory. Heavenly angels will be able to read, in the thrift and painstaking effort revealed in the care of the farm, the story of the improvement made by the students themselves in character-building. On this farm the students are to learn how to earn their living by honest work. Such a knowledge will be of inestimable value to them when they go forth to teach others of their race. PCO 149.3

Sources: The Review and Herald, September 21, 1905

To our workers among the colored people, and especially to those who are teaching the children and the youth, I would say, Hold fast. Do not lose courage. We shall all be tried, to see of what material we are made. Work with an eye single to the glory of God. Labor to uplift and ennoble your students. They will be what you make them, largely. Teach them that their souls can be made clean in the blood of the Lamb. Hold up before them the hope that they can be Christians in thought, in word, in deed. Thus souls will be won to Christ. Tell them, oh, tell them of the love of Jesus, who taketh away the sin of the world. PCO 149.4

Keep ever before your students the thought that they are in school to be fitted to act their part in helping others to prepare for a place in the family above. The Lord desires them to act kindly and courteously, because they are members of His family. Keep this before them always. Doing this, you cannot speak harshly to them, neither can you be coarse or rough, because this would not harmonize with the Bible principles that you are trying to teach them. PCO 150.1

Teachers, keep heaven and the Saviour before your students. Impress their minds with the thought that they must do their very best; for God's eye is upon them. This teaching you may certainly class as a branch of higher education. PCO 150.2

Teachers are to bring into the schoolroom a softening, subduing influence. In their daily habits they are to be an example of propriety. In their dress they are always to be neat and tidy. Children are naturally quick to imitate; and as they see habits of order and cleanliness, industry and Christian integrity, exemplified in the daily life of their teacher, their own lives will be powerfully influenced for good. Excellent results will appear. PCO 150.3

Source: The Gospel Herald, October 1, 1907

There is a special and important work for you to accomplish. Clear directions are given in the Word of God regarding the part that you are to act. “If ye then be risen with Christ, seek those things which are above, where Christ sitteth on the right hand of God. Set your affections on things above, not on things on the earth. For ye are dead and your life is hid with Christ in God.” PCO 150.4

Source: Southern Field Echo, April 1, 1910

I would urge upon you the importance of determination to honor God by consecrating to Him the power of mind and body. It is your privilege to give yourselves to God. In word and deed seek to honor Him. Set your mark high, and by constant watchfulness gain decided victories. PCO 150.5

Be kind in all you do and say. If anyone speaks harsh, irritating words to you, do not retaliate. Speak gently, and thus help those around you to bear the cross after Jesus. In every perplexity ask God for advice and counsel, and it will be given. When your mind is troubled, go to the Lord Jesus and ask Him to give you His grace. Cast all your care upon Him who cares for you. “In everything by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made known unto God.” PCO 150.6

Source: Southern Field Echo, April 1, 1910

Condition

Brother Sutherland thought that perhaps he ought to return to Berrien Springs immediately upon reaching Nashville after this trip; but we do not think that this would be wisdom. Early next week we have an important meeting to attend at Huntsville, and it is very important that our brethren should be at that meeting, for decisions are to be made as to what shall be done with the Huntsville School. The future of this school is hanging in the balance. PCO 151.1

Sources: Letter 193, 1904

My visit to our school for the colored people, at Huntsville, Alabama, brought me great sorrow of heart. I had known that this institution was in pressing need of substantial help, but I had not understood fully the real condition of the school. That which I saw staggered me. I asked myself, “How can the brethren in the South, who have seen the needs of this school, remain silent? In what light does God regard their failure to bestir themselves in an effort to place this school on vantage-ground? How can He acquit the sight of their eyes?” PCO 151.2

The equipment of the Huntsville School is very incomplete. Even some of the most common necessities are lacking. There are no proper facilities for giving treatment to the sick. Those who attend this school have been getting along with crude makeshifts, hoping that in time some of the necessities would be supplied. PCO 151.3

That which to me seemed the greatest mystery of all was the striking contrast between-----and Huntsville. At-----the school and the sanitarium have been built up substantially by friends both in the North and in the South. The----brethren and sisters have given much toward the erection and equipment of good buildings. The-----community has an appearance of thrift and prosperity. This is as it should be. But I could not understand how those there, who have known of the destitution of a sister institution at Huntsville, have been content to continue building up their home institutions, without doing something for the training-school for colored people. PCO 151.4

Sources: The Southern Missionary, September 1, 1904

A school for colored people is being carried on in Huntsville, but I was greatly pained while there to see the poverty-stricken condition of the institution. I knew from previous presentations, that this was displeasing to God and that the school was not accomplishing that which He designed it to accomplish. I resolved to bear a plain, clear-cut testimony to our people, telling them that the money spent in the adornment of dress is a misappropriation of God's money, lent us to use in the advancement of His work. PCO 151.5

Sources: (Australasian) Union Conference Record, September 1, 1904

Early this past summer I visited the South and spent several weeks there. As I traveled from place to place, I saw anew the poverty-stricken condition of the field, and was reminded vividly of scenes that have often been presented to me in the night season. PCO 151.6

The condition of the Industrial School established for the training of Christian workers at Huntsville, Ala., appealed strongly to my sympathies. The large farm of three hundred and sixty acres, purchased by the General Conference as a home for this institution, will, with intelligent cultivation, meet a considerable portion of the running expenses of the school. But the buildings have been inadequate for the work that should be done. The teachers and students have very few schoolroom appliances. In the students’ home and on the farm there have been very few suitable facilities. Some new buildings must be erected and furnished. Good bathrooms are greatly needed. In connection with this school, students are to be trained for the medical missionary work. PCO 152.1

Sources: The Signs of the Times, November 30, 1904; And Their Cry Came Up Unto God, 5-6

The school at Huntsville is greatly in need of help, that young colored people may be prepared to go forth to work as teachers for their own race. There is a great need in the Southern field of an orphanage for Colored children. At Huntsville a beginning has been made on a building for this purpose, but the work has stopped for lack of means. A small sanitarium is also needed at Huntsville. Let those who desire to work place their zeal and their efforts where they will tell in supplying a genuine necessity. PCO 152.2

Source: Record of Progress and An Earnest Appeal In Behalf of the Boulder-Colorado Sanitarium, 36

I felt great sadness of heart on hearing that one of the Huntsville School buildings had been consumed by fire. I am so sorry that one life was lost. We must now do our very best to make the needed improvements at the school. I am not favorably impressed by what you say about all the buildings that are to be erected being small. We must not let the work at Huntsville flag or be brought down to small dimensions. There is need of buildings, and there is need of larger buildings, but these must not be extravagantly large, for the work in other places in the South must be considered. PCO 152.3

Sources: Letter 348, 1906; Manuscript Releases 2:71

Instruction

You speak of the Oakwood Industrial School for colored students as not having sufficient buildings to accommodate the students, twelve in number occupying one room. My brother, is it not the duty of someone laboring in this line to labor for the creation of a fund to supply this need? Let appeals be made to our people. Let each give a little, even among the poor. Without delay, encourage the brethren to erect a humble building large enough to accommodate the students. PCO 152.4

Sources: Letter 90, 1899; The Southern Review, 85

Wise plans are to be laid for the cultivation of the land. The students are to be given a practical education in agriculture. This education will be of inestimable value to them in their future work. Thorough work is to be done in cultivating the land, and from this the students are to learn how necessary it is to do thorough work in cultivating the garden of the heart. PCO 152.5

The teachers should constantly seek wisdom from on high, that they may be kept from making mistakes. They should give careful consideration to their work, that each student may be prepared for the line of service to which he is best adapted. All are to be prepared to serve faithfully in some capacity. PCO 153.1

No laxness is to be allowed. The man who takes charge of the Huntsville School should know how to govern himself and how to govern others. The Bible teacher should be a man who can teach the students how to present the truths of the Word of God in public, and how to do house-to-house work. The business affairs of the farm are to be wisely and carefully managed. PCO 153.2

Each student is to take himself in hand, and with God's help overcome the faults that mar his character. And he is to show an earnest, unselfish spirit in the welfare of the school. If he sees a loose board in a walk or a loose paling on the fence, let him at once get a hammer and nails, and make the needed repairs. The wagons and harnesses should be properly cared for and frequently examined and repaired. When harnesses and wagons are sent out in a dilapidated condition, human life is endangered. PCO 153.3

Sources: Letter 215, 1904; The Review and Herald, September 1, 1904; Manuscript Releases 2:68-69; Manuscript Releases 14:38-40; The Oakwood Manual Training School, 8-9; Spalding and Magan Collection, 360

Just before we left, a meeting of the Southern Union Conference Committee was held in Nashville for the purpose of devising some means of helping the Huntsville School. Those who have had charge of the school have not felt the importance of putting brain, bone, and muscle to the tax in an effort to make the school a success. The students who attend this school are to be given an education that will fit them to work for the Master. They are to be given more than book knowledge. Should they be given book knowledge merely, their education would be imperfect. PCO 153.4

There should be a special school for the younger ones. Fathers and mothers are to be placed on the land, and parents as well as children are to be given an education. Promising families are to be brought in and settled upon a piece of ground as large as shall be deemed best. In connection with the school there should be an experienced carpenter who can teach the fathers and their boys how to build their homes, which are to be neat, convenient, inexpensive buildings. The mothers should be taught how to prepare food hygienically, and how to care for the sick. PCO 153.5

Sources: Letter 233, 1904; Manuscript Releases 14:215

A small sanitarium should also be established in connection with the Huntsville School. The sanitarium building should not be of a shoddy character. Neither should it be narrow and contracted. It should be built substantially, and there should be in it a room for the physician and nurses, to carry on the work of healing the sick and giving patients and students an education in regard to the right principles of living. PCO 153.6

Sources: Letter 205, 1905; The Southern Work, August 29, 1905; Spalding and Magan Collection, 380; To Those in Charge of the Colored Orphanage Enterprise, 4

At the Huntsville School a thorough work is to be done in training men to cultivate the soil and to grow fruits and vegetables. Let no one despise this work. Agriculture is the ABC of industrial education. Let the erection of the buildings for the school and the sanitarium be an education to the students. Help the teachers to understand that their perceptions must be clear, their actions in harmony with the truth, for it is only when they stand in right relation to God that they will be able to work out His plan for themselves and for the souls with whom, as instructors, they are brought in contact. PCO 153.7

Let us encourage all Seventh-day Adventists to have a deep interest in the work that is being done at Huntsville for the education of men and women to be laborers among the colored people. The preparations for a sanitarium for these people should go forward at Huntsville without delay. If we will move forward with faith in God, He will fulfill His word to us. We have no time to lose, for wickedness in the cities is reaching a terrible pass. The night is coming in which no man can work. Let us not grudge to the colored people a well-equipped sanitarium in connection with the Huntsville School. The building should not be restricted. It should be made roomy enough to accommodate with comfort those who shall come to it. PCO 154.1

Sources: Letter 289, 1907; Manuscript Releases 2:74

Providence

In the night season I was taken from place to place, from city to city, in the Southern field. I saw the great work to be done—the work that ought to have been done years ago. We seemed to be looking at many places. Our first interest was for the places where the work has already been established, and for the places where the way has opened for a beginning to be made. I saw the places in the South where institutions have been established for the advancement of the Lord's work. One of the places that I saw was Graysville, and another [was] Huntsville. The Lord led in the establishment of these schools. PCO 154.2

Sources: Letter 25, 1902; Manuscript Releases 2:64; Testimonies for the Church 7:231

The schools in Graysville and Huntsville were established in the order of God. They are to do a work for Him. PCO 154.3

Sources: The General Conference Bulletin, April 14, 1903; The Southern Work, October 25, 1904; The Ellen G. White 1888 Materials, 1800

I would call your special attention to the needs of the Huntsville School. This school is on a farm of over three hundred acres, which was purchased by the General Conference and given to the work for the colored people of the South. This school farm is to be made a representation of what can be done to help the colored people. PCO 154.4

It was in the providence of God that the Huntsville School Farm was purchased. It is in a good locality. Near it there are large nurseries, and in these nurseries some of the students have worked during the summer to earn money to pay their expense at the Huntsville School. Those for whom these students have worked give them a high recommendation, saying that they have accomplished more than an equal number of other hands. PCO 154.5

Sources: Letter 313, 1904; The Oakwood Manual Training School, 11

In the night season I was taken by my Guide from place to place, from city to city, in the South. I saw the great work to be done—that which ought to have been done years ago. We seemed to be looking at many places. Our first interest was for the places where the work has already been established and for those where the way has opened for a beginning to be made. I saw where there are institutions for the advancement of the Lord's work. One of these places was Graysville, and another, Huntsville, where we have industrial schools. These schools are to receive encouragement and help, for the Lord led in their establishment. Each has advantages of its own. PCO 155.1

Source: Testimonies for the Church 7:231

In Graysville, in Huntsville, and in many other places, God has been opening the way for the establishment of interests that will be as lights in a dark place, and will prepare the way for the acceptance of saving truth. PCO 155.2

Source: Selections from the Testimonies for the Church For the Study of Those Attending the General Conference in Oakland, Ca., March 27, 1903, 61

Purpose

It was for the education of Christian workers that, in the providence of God, the General Conference purchased a beautiful farm of three hundred acres near Huntsville, Ala., and established an industrial training-school for colored students. During the past two or three years I have often received instruction in regard to this school, showing what manner of school it should be, and what those who go there as students are to become. PCO 155.3

Sources: The Review and Herald, September 21, 1905; Testimonies to the Church Regarding The Strengthening of Our Institutions and Training Centers, 19; The Huntsville School, 4

Long before I visited Huntsville the Oakwood School Farm was presented to me, both as it then was and as it might be in the future if wisely managed and properly cared for. PCO 155.4

The presentation of what the place ought to be, included an orphanage and a sanitarium. I was also shown cultivated fields, gardens where vegetables were cultivated, and orchards bearing abundance of fruit. PCO 155.5

Instruction was given me that the Lord would have consecrated, unselfish Christian workers connected with the Oakwood School, who would use skillfully the advantages of the Oakwood Farm for the benefit of the students in the school and the children in the orphanage. These advantages were to be used wisely in helping to supply the necessities of the orphans and in obtaining for them an education and training that would be pleasing to the Lord. PCO 155.6

I have been instructed that for the development of the Oakwood enterprises, the very best class of workers should be secured, because a special work is to be done here in revealing what religious education will do for the orphans and the outcasts through the labors of consecrated and skilful teachers. The teachers connected with the school must bear in mind that they are dealing with the purchase of the blood of Christ, with souls who, through earnest, God-fearing labors may become members of the Lord's family. PCO 156.1

Sources: To Those in Charge of the Colored Orphanage Enterprise, 1-2; The Huntsville School, 2

At the Huntsville School a thorough work is to be done in training men to cultivate the soil and to grow fruits and vegetables. Let no one despise this work. Agriculture is the ABC of industrial education. Let the erection of the buildings for the school and the sanitarium be an education to the students. Help the teachers to understand that their perceptions must be clear, their actions in harmony with the truth; for it is only when they stand in right relation to God that they will be able to work out His plan for themselves, and for the souls with whom, as instructors, they are brought in contact. PCO 156.2

Sources: Southern Field Echo, May 1, 1910

Support

I present before you, my dear brethren and sisters, the work among the colored people as the object of your liberality. The mission-schools, the training-school at Huntsville, the Nashville colored Sanitarium, the ministers and Bible workers devoting their time to the salvation of the colored people-all these and many other agencies are in great need of funds. The work must go forward. Every penny that can be spared should be invested in the Lord's cause. Let us see if the November collection cannot result in thousands of dollars flowing into the treasury. PCO 156.3

Sources: The Southern Watchman (1901), October 25, 1904.

The Huntsville School greatly needs additional buildings. It ought to be fitted up for the accommodation of one hundred students, to be trained as teachers of their own race. A small building in which the students can be taught to care for the sick, should be put up near the school, and conveniences furnished. PCO 156.4

The students are to be carefully disciplined. They are to be given a thorough education, an education that will fit them to teach others. As soon as possible they are to be prepared for service. The young men who attend school should be taught how to put up buildings and how to cultivate the soil. At present white teachers can take part in the work of this school, educating and training the students. But soon it will be impossible for them to do this. Let us make earnest efforts to help this school to act its part now, while the way is still open. At present there are no outside opposing influences to hinder its progress. PCO 156.5

I now ask you to give of your means for the Huntsville School. Facilities are needed there. Things about the institution are at loose ends, and should be put in proper order, that the school may be a credit to the cause it represents.... PCO 157.1

I present this matter to you, my brethren and sisters, and I ask you to do what you can for the advancement of the work that a few faithful laborers are trying to do for the colored race. This work has been greatly retarded by neglect and because means sufficient to supply its needs have not been provided. PCO 157.2

I ask you, my brethren and sisters, to do your best.... By willing liberality let us prepare the way for the laborers in the South to do a work of mercy for this people. I urge you in the name of the Lord to do something, and do it now. I pray that God will open your hearts, and help you to do justice to the needs of the work for the colored people. PCO 157.3

Sources: Letter 313, 1904; The Oakwood Manual Training School, 11-12; Manuscript Releases 4:25-26

Several years ago it was presented to me that the Gentile world should be called upon to make donations to our work in the Southern field. Let discreet, God-fearing men go to worldly men that have means, and lay before them a plan of what they desire to do for the colored people. Let them tell about the Huntsville School, about the orphanage that we desire to build there, and about the colored mission schools that are needed all over the southern States. Let the needs of this work be presented by men who understand how to reach the hearts of men of means. Many of these men, if approached in the right way, would make gifts to the work. PCO 157.4

Sources: Letter 295, 1905; Manuscript Releases 2:70-71

My brethren and sisters in the South, will you not act your part in the good work of helping the Huntsville School? Have you not some time to spare in its behalf, that you can devote to the sale of Christ's Object Lessons? By taking up this work you will be acting as missionaries for the Lord Jesus. His approval will rest upon you as you try to assist the faithful workers in the Huntsville School. By circulating Christ's Object Lessons, not only will you be helping the Huntsville School but you will be placing in the hands of men and women a book containing the most precious spiritual instruction. PCO 157.5

The Huntsville School is in need of help. Let our people take hold earnestly of the circulation of Christ's Object Lessonsin its behalf. If you will act your part faithfully, the school can get the equipment that it so much needs. Christ says to His disciples, “Ye are the light of the world.” “Let your light so shine before men that they may see your good works, and glorify your Father which is in heaven.” PCO 157.6

Sources: Ms 103, 1907; Manuscript Releases 2:78

Vision

The light given me is that the schools in Graysville and Huntsville make these towns places of special interest. In both of these places there are excellent opportunities for giving the students manual training. I mention these places particularly because they have been presented to me by the Lord as places in which we should make persevering efforts to build up and strengthen the work. In these places there is much to be done, and the efforts of the laborers should be specially directed to this work until something is completed that will be an object lesson of what can be done. PCO 158.1

Sources: Letter 87, 1902; Manuscript Releases 2:66; Manuscript Releases 14:46-47; Testimonies for the Church 7:234

Brother _____ has been chosen to act as business manager and principal of the Huntsville School. For years he has labored in school work for the colored people in Mississippi, under the direction of the Southern Missionary Society. He is a teacher of experience, and is a capable manager. Associated with him will be a faculty competent to carry forward all branches of instruction, both in the school lines and in industrial training. The efficiency of the school will be much improved this year. PCO 158.2

Source: Letter 221, 1904; Manuscript Releases 2:69

The schools in Graysville and Huntsville were established in the order of God. They are to do a work for Him. They are to become self-supporting, by making the best use of their land, by raising those products best suited to the climate and soil of their locality. Various industries are to be established. The Lord will greatly bless these industries if the workers will walk in His counsel. If they will look to Him, He will be their wisdom and their righteousness. His wisdom will be seen in the work of those who follow His directions. He will teach all who will learn of Him His meekness and lowliness. PCO 158.3

Sources: The General Conference Bulletin, April 14, 1903; The Southern Work, October 25, 1904; The Ellen G. White 1888 Materials, 1800

I am so pleased to see the colored students who are here today. I wish that there were a hundred of them, as it has been presented to me that there should be.... PCO 158.4

In regard to this school here at Huntsville, I wish to say that for the past two or three years I have been receiving instruction regarding it—what it should be and what those who come here as students are to become. All that is done by those connected with this school, whether they be white or black, is to be done with the realization that this is the Lord's institution, in which the students are to be taught how to cultivate the land, and how to labor for the uplifting of their own people. PCO 158.5

Sources: The Southern Missionary, June 1, 1904; Manuscript Releases 6:210-211; Ms 60, 1904; Manuscript Releases 4:25

Over and over again the light has been given that a special work is to be done in Huntsville. Those who are rooted and grounded in the truth, in all its bearings, are to be placed in charge of the work. A beginning has been made on the orphanage for colored children, but this work stands unfinished. On the beautiful farm of over three hundred acres, God purposes that an efficient missionary training school shall be conducted, which will develop many workers for the colored people. PCO 158.6

Sources: Letter 205, 1905; The Southern Work, August 29, 1905; Spalding and Magan Collection, 380; To Those in Charge of the Colored Orphanage Enterprise, 3

The land at Huntsville was a donation from our people to the colored work. A much broader work would have been accomplished there had our people moved forward in faith and self-denial. It was God's design that Huntsville should have convenient school buildings and a sanitarium for the colored people. This sanitarium building has become a positive necessity. Some of the brethren have been free to give their advice concerning this institution, saying that it should be “a small sanitarium.” The advice I have had to give has been that we should have a modest but roomy sanitarium, where the sick can be taken in and treated. The colored race should have the benefits of such an institution as verily as should the white people. In this sanitarium colored nurses are to be trained for service in the field as gospel medical missionaries. PCO 159.1

Sources: Letter 322, 1907; Manuscript Releases 2:77

When this light was given me, I had never seen Huntsville. I was shown that Huntsville would be a place of special interest to those who would act their part to help the colored people. PCO 159.2

Sources: To Those in Charge of the Colored Orphanage Enterprise, 2-3; The Huntsville School, 2

We are endeavoring to bring the colored people to that place where they can be self-supporting. The time will come when you will be able to escape many of the evils that will come upon the world because you have obtained a correct knowledge of how to plant and to build, and how to carry various enterprises. This is why we want this land occupied and cultivated, why we want buildings put up. The students are to learn how to plant, and to build, and to sow. As they learn to do this, they will see a work before them which they will be very glad to have a part in. Opportunities will present themselves by which they can make themselves a blessing to those around them. PCO 159.3

Source: Ms. 27, 1909; Manuscript Releases 2:83; Southern Field Echo, June 1, 1909