Evangelism, the very heart of Christianity, is the theme of primary importance to those called to herald God's last warning to a doomed world. We are in time's closing hours, and the Advent message, proclaimed to make ready a people prepared for our Lord's return, must swell to a loud cry reaching the uttermost parts of the earth. Ev 5.1

Since the early days of the work of Seventh-day Adventists, the Spirit of prophecy instruction placing special emphasis upon the principles and practice of soul winning has been given to guide in an expanding work. Some phases of evangelism have been delineated in nearly all the Ellen G. White books. Through the years, in the Review and Herald, Signs of the Times, and other journals, articles from the Lord's messenger have given impetus to a growing evangelistic ministry. Individual evangelists were also, from time to time, favored in receiving instruction and warning regarding methods that should characterize their labor. Occasionally groups of evangelists and denominational administrators were addressed by Mrs. White, and these addresses often embodied much helpful counsel. Ev 5.2

But these periodical articles, special testimonies, personal counsels, and addresses are not generally available today. It is to make this full body of timely instruction accessible to our present greatly enlarged Seventh-day Adventist evangelistic force that there is now issued this comprehensive, topically arranged compilation. Devoted exclusively to the all-important subject of evangelism. Ev 5.3

This volume not only sets forth the well-established guiding principles which should mold the work of the evangelist and Bible instructor but also presents a wealth of minute counsel regarding the application of those principles. As a compilation of the precious instruction which the Lord has given all through the years, it is a veritable handbook of evangelism for the Advent movement. Ev 6.1

In bringing together and arranging in logical order many statements from various sources, it was found that certain general lines of instruction were repeatedly set forth. In the effort to place before the reader all that contributed to the subject, without presenting undue repetition, only paragraphs or groups of paragraphs were selected. In some cases repetitious sentences were dropped from even the brief excerpts used, and in each case the deletion is indicated. Great care has been exercised, however, to present statements of sufficient length to give the correct setting for the counsel. Ev 6.2

An endeavor has been made to make each section a complete treatment of the subject presented. In so doing there accrues a certain degree of unavoidable repetition of thought which emphasizes the instruction. As an aid in making ready reference to the key statements in this volume, side headings appearing in bold type have been supplied by the compilers. A source credit appears at the close of each excerpt, and as a further aid to the reader, there is given the date of writing, in case of the manuscript quotations, or the date of first publication in the case of other reference. Ev 6.3

A knowledge of the time of the utterance sometimes serves as a helpful guide to the application of the counsel, for our work must be conducted under changing conditions. And although in some instances it may not be possible to employ in minute detail methods advocated in earlier years, yet the basic principles enunciated or illustrated in these earlier counsels will today be a guide to safe and fruitful methods. Principle is changeless, though its application may call for an adjustment and adaptation to meet present conditions. We present a concrete illustration of this point. Ev 6.4

The reader will find frequent mention of the camp meeting, and counsel as to its conduct. In the seventies Seventh-day Adventist camp meetings attracted very large non-Adventist week-end attendance, with congregations ranging from half church members and half non-Adventists to the unusual ratio of fifteen non-Adventists to one church member. In the nineties very successful evangelistic camp meetings held in the suburbs of large cities lasted from two weeks to a month. Such meetings were of large soul-winning potentiality. Many statements commending such meetings and giving instruction regarding their successful conduct were penned through those years. Ev 7.1

But times have changed; the camp meeting has become a gathering almost exclusively for an enlarging church group. The non-Adventist throngs attracted in earlier years by the camp meeting are now reached more effectively through the tent or hall meeting. Nevertheless, the principles guiding to successful methods in the evangelistic camp meetings serve safely and well in leading to fruitful methods in present-day evangelism. Ev 7.2

The instruction in this book is restricted almost entirely to the evangelistic work of the minister and the Bible instructor. The voluminous counsel in regard to lay evangelism, set forth so fully in other E. G. White productions, also guidance on literature evangelism which fills such an important place in our work, are not repeated here because of space limitations. Likewise, medical evangelism, treated so fully and well in Ministry of Healing, Medical Ministry, and Counsels on Health, is not dwelt upon except as it relates to the public presentation of the message. Much more might be included on the qualifications of the evangelist, but the quotations on this topic are here limited to such points as have a direct bearing on his special work. Ev 7.3

This volume is now sent into the field with the conviction that its appearance will mark a definite advance in methods of evangelism. Its constructive, up-to-date counsel, its timely cautions, its views of the triumph of the message, will, we believe, constitute a “blueprint,” guiding an evangelism that will reach its glorious climax under the loud cry of the third angel. Ev 8.1

The Trustees of the

Ellen G. White Publications.