Noah Webster’s 1828 Dictionary

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JUSTICEABLE — JUXTAPOSITION

JUSTICEABLE, a. Liable to account in a court of justice. [Little used.]

JUSTICER, n. An administrator of justice. [Little used.]

JUSTICESHIP, n. The office or dignity of a justice.

JUSTICIARY, JUSTICIAR, n. [L. justiciarius.] An administrator of justice.

1. A chief justice.

2. One that boasts of the justice of his own act. [Not used.]

JUSTIFIABLE, a. [from justify.] That may be proved to be just; that may be vindicated on principles of law, reason, rectitude or propriety; defensible; vindicable. No breach of law or moral obligation is justifiable. The execution of a malefactor in pursuance of a sentence of court, is justifiable homicide.

JUSTIFIABLENESS, n. The quality of being justifiable; rectitude; possibility of being defended or vindicated.

JUSTIFIABLY, adv. In a manner that admits of vindication or justification; rightly.

JUSTIFICATION, n.

1. The act of justifying; a showing to be just or conformable to law, rectitude or propriety; vindication; defense. The court listened to the evidence and arguments in justification of the prisoner’s conduct. Our disobedience to God’s commands admits no justification.

2. Absolution.

I hope, for my brother’s justification, he wrote this but as an essay of my virtue.

3. In law, the showing of a sufficient reason in court why a defendant did what he is called to answer. Pleas in justification must set forth some special matter.

4. In theology, remission of sin and absolution from guilt and punishment; or an act of free grace by which God pardons the sinner and accepts him as righteous, on account of the atonement of Christ.

JUSTIFICATIVE, a. Justifying; that has power to justify.

JUSTIFICATOR, n. One who justifies. [Little used.]

JUSTIFIER, n. One who justifies; one who vindicates, supports or defends.

1. He who pardons and absolves from guilt and punishment.

That he might be just, and the justifier of him who believeth in Jesus. Romans 3:26.

JUSTIFY, v.t. [L. justus, just, and facio, to make.]

1. To prove or show to be just, or conformable to law, right, justice, propriety or duty; to defend or maintain; to vindicate as right. We cannot justify disobedience or ingratitude to our Maker. We cannot justify insult or incivility to our fellow men. Intemperance, lewdness, profaneness and dueling are in no case to be justified.

2. In theology, to pardon and clear form guilt; to absolve or acquit from guilt and merited punishment, and to accept as righteous on account of the merits of the Savior, or by the application of Christ’s atonement to the offender.

3. To cause another to appear comparatively righteous, or less guilty than one’s self. Ezekiel 16:51-52.

4. To judge rightly of.

Wisdom is justified by her children. Matthew 11:19.

5. To accept as just and treat with favor. James 2:21, 24-25.

JUSTIFY, v.i. In printing, to agree; to suit; to conform exactly; to form an even surface or true line with something else. Types of different sizes will not justify with each other.

JUSTLE, v.i. jus’l. [See Jostle and Just.] To run against; to encounter; to strike against; to clash.

The chariots shall rage in the streets; they shall justle one against another in the broad ways. Nahum 2:4.

JUSTLE, v.t. jus’l. To push; to drive; to force by rushing against; commonly followed by off or out; as, to justle a thing off the table, or out of its place.

JUSTLY, adv. [from just.] In conformity to law, justice or propriety; by right. The offender is justly condemned. The hero is justly rewarded, applauded or honored.

1. According to truth and facts. His character is justly described.

2. Honestly; fairly; with integrity; as, to do justly. Micah 6:8.

3. Properly; accurately; exactly.

Their feet assist their hands, and justly beat the ground.

JUSTNESS, n. Accuracy; exactness; as the justness of proportions.

1. Conformity to truth; as the justness of a description or representation.

2. Justice; reasonableness; equity; as the justness of a cause or of a demand. [Justness is properly applied to things, and justice to persons; but the distinction is not always observed.]

JUT, v.i. [a different spelling of jet.] To shoot forward; to project beyond the main body; as the jutting part of a building. A point of land juts into the sea.

JUT, n. A shooting forward; a projection.

JUTTING, ppr. Shooting out; projecting.

JUTTY, v.i. To jut. [Not used.]

JUTTY, n. A projection in a building; also, a pier or mole.

JUT-WINDOW, n. A window that projects form the line of a building.

JUVENILE, a. [L. juvenilis, from juvenis, young.]

1. Young; youthful; as juvenile years or age.

2. Pertaining or suited to youth; as juvenile sports.

JUVENILITY, n. Youthfulness; youthful age.

1. Light and careless manner; the manners or customs of youth.

JUXTAPOSITED, a. [L. juxta, near, and posited.]

Placed near; adjacent or contiguous.

JUXTAPOSITION, n. [L. juxta, near, and position.]

A placing or being placed in nearness or contiguity; as the parts of a substance or of a composition. The connection of words is sometimes to be ascertained by juxtaposition.