The Truth Found

19/21

A SHORT ARGUMENT FOR THE SABBATH

It has often been asserted that the truth is hard to find; that almost all things are matters of uncertainty, inasmuch as men equally honest, intelligent, and learned, will arrive at different conclusions from an examination of the same facts. But it is not so. That learned men do come to different conclusions on the same subjects will not be denied; but that they are equally honest and unprejudiced in their investigations cannot be believed. Ten men, or ten thousand men, must come to the same conclusion if they reason legitimately, and from established, or evident, truths. To suppose otherwise, is to suppose that opposite conclusions can be legitimately drawn from the same truth, which is absurd. It is only when they range the fields of fancy, and seek to gratify inclination, or sustain certain prepossessions rather than to conform to reason, that they arrive at different conclusions. Otherwise the search for truth would be but a chase after an ignis-fatuus, not to be attained, nor worth attaining. TFNOS 43.2

GOD’S WORD IS TRUTH. There is nothing equivalent to it—nothing can be taken as a substitute for ?? Firmly relying on it, I propose to examine its coachings on the subject of the Sabbath. This is a subject of great importance and of growing interest; and whenever plain statements of the word are adduced, I call upon all Bible believers to acknowledge their authority, and to assent to all necessary conclusions drawn therefrom. I shall then show, by an examination of opposing views, whence arises the confusion and diversity of opinion, so much deprecated in words, yet so upheld in practice, by the majority. TFNOS 43.3

I shall examine the subject under the following heads:— TFNOS 44.1

I. WHAT GOD’S WORD TEACHES CONCERNING THE SABBATH.

II. WHAT THE NEW TESTAMENT TEACHES CONCERNING THE FIRST DAY OF THE WEEK.

III. THE OPINIONS OF LEARNED MEN ON THE SUBJECT.

I shall lay down one rule of evidence, which I shall strictly follow; and, from its reasonableness, I shall expect all to acquiesce in it, and abide by it, in examining these remarks, namely:— TFNOS 44.2

Admit facts as proof against facts, and let inferences stand against inferences; but no plain truth can be overthrown by an inference. This must be allowed, unless the position be taken that the less disproves the greater, which, of course, cannot be. TFNOS 44.3

Respecting inferences, I adopt the following from Dr. A. Carson, namely:— TFNOS 44.4

An unnecessary inference is without authority. TFNOS 44.5