Letters and Manuscripts — Volume 19

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Lt 93, 1904

White, W. C.

“Elmshaven,” St. Helena, California

February 21, 1904

Portions of this letter are published in 4MR 89. +Note

My dear son Willie,—

I thank you very much for your letters, which are so full of news, and also for the copies of letters that you send from time to time. 19LtMs, Lt 93, 1904, par. 1

I have no objection to Brother E. R. Palmer’s connecting with and acting a part in the sanitarium at San Diego. I feel very tender toward him. 19LtMs, Lt 93, 1904, par. 2

With regard to the brethren Ross, I am inclined to think that you would better write them further before deciding to have them connect with the institution. I am not well enough acquainted with them to be able to speak intelligently in regard to this. I was pleased with what I saw of them in Indianapolis. The slight acquaintance that I have with them is pleasant. But it would be impossible for me to say what would be just the right thing to do in regard to asking them to connect with the sanitarium. We must look to God for wisdom at every step. If the furniture that you speak of can be secured at a reasonable price, I think that it might be well to purchase it. It will be no small matter to furnish the building at San Diego for sanitarium work. 19LtMs, Lt 93, 1904, par. 3

In regard to the sale of your house, I advise you to dispose of it if you can. Then a smaller house can be built for you on any site that you may choose on my property, on this side or the other side of the road. But this will be a consideration for the future. I wish to say, my son, that my family and yours could not possibly occupy one house, here or in any other place. Noise and bustle I cannot bear. This must be understood. Our families could never occupy one house, but we must be near together, so that you can work with me. 19LtMs, Lt 93, 1904, par. 4

In regard to moving our goods to Washington, I would say that it is doubtful whether I shall go to Washington. I obtain no light on the question, except the words, “I have a refuge for you.” The instruction that has been given me is that my strength is not to be exhausted in public effort for our churches or in traveling for long distances. 19LtMs, Lt 93, 1904, par. 5

I fear that I shall not be able to go to Washington, even for a short time. I must spend the winters in a warm climate. During December and January, and especially January, we had the most beautiful weather for winter that I have ever experienced. During this month much rain has fallen, but it has been soft and gentle. Two weeks ago, the road just below Napa bridge was covered with water to a depth of three feet. 19LtMs, Lt 93, 1904, par. 6

I had an appointment to speak in the St. Helena church last Sabbath. When Sabbath came, the morning was foggy, and the sky became cloudy. We feared that it might rain, but I kept my appointment, and we had a very good meeting. I spoke with freedom from the first chapter of Second Peter, and those present were much interested. There were many young men and women and children in the congregation. I was glad that I went. 19LtMs, Lt 93, 1904, par. 7

I took a little cold, although I thought that I had taken every precaution against this. I have not been able to write at all since Sabbath. I have had to make myself write these few lines to you. 19LtMs, Lt 93, 1904, par. 8

I have not yet recovered from the ill turn that I had the morning after you left. My head has been dizzy the greater part of the time since. I have not been able to use it. 19LtMs, Lt 93, 1904, par. 9

My son, you must not plan to move our family. I see no light in this, but much that looks forbidding. The light that has been given me in the past is: “You must not place yourself under circumstances that will imperil your health. You have a work to do in preparing books, and you must not place yourself where additional burdens will fall on you.” 19LtMs, Lt 93, 1904, par. 10

I am warned that we cannot foresee and read just circumstances, and that I positively must have rest and quiet. The troubles of the church must not be brought upon me. I think that if I had to pass again through the experience that I passed through while attending the Oakland General Conference, it would cost me my life. So painful was this experience that I can never again risk going through such another. 19LtMs, Lt 93, 1904, par. 11

Those who cause so much trouble and such acute suffering will in the future have to carry their own burdens. It is possible for a few so to manage matters that the enemy will work through them to wound and bruise my soul and destroy my life. “Keep away from all contention,” my Instructor said. “Leave the burdens on the ones who have created them. Do your work, not for a few, but for the many. Your voice must be heard by those not of our faith. The less you see of and suffer over the wrong course of those who have not heeded the light that has come to them again and again, and who, by their refusal to repent of their evil course, are bringing confusion and perplexity and heart-agony, the more strength and light and counsel you can give to those who will appreciate the light and who will not follow a course that will wear out your life. Until the end of time there will be some who will persist in following a wrong course and in regarding their own wisdom as sufficient. Such ones will be unprepared to meet the Lord.” 19LtMs, Lt 93, 1904, par. 12

The Scriptures often speak of the stubborn resistance of the children of Israel to the light given them. Satan stands ready to control all who will allow him to lead them. 19LtMs, Lt 93, 1904, par. 13

The Lord does not desire me to carry on my soul the burden of men and women who have been warned and corrected personally, but who have gone directly contrary to the counsel given them. Many do not follow on to know the Lord. Many have had all the evidence that they will ever receive. They do not need further counsel; they need to appreciate and follow out the counsel already given them, from which they have turned away, because it is not in harmony with the ideas that the author of all evil has suggested to their minds. 19LtMs, Lt 93, 1904, par. 14

Many have said, “the temple of the Lord, the temple of the Lord, are we.” [Jeremiah 7:4.] But they have accumulated so much worldly business upon their hands that they have no time to set their hearts in order. There is great danger that they will become so absorbed in the bustle and hurry of their business that they will have no time to examine themselves in the light of God’s Word. They have become confused in regard to what constitutes true Christian service. 19LtMs, Lt 93, 1904, par. 15

Let those who attend the council meetings held follow our Lord into the solitude of Olivet. Let them look to their example—Jesus, the author and finisher of their faith. They may themselves devise plans which would keep the church continually employed, but which would retard rather than advance the cause of God. Men are in great danger of accepting the false for the true. Satan is greatly pleased when strength of mind and body is employed in hindering the work that should be moving forward unto perfection. 19LtMs, Lt 93, 1904, par. 16

Let us work with all humility of mind, working out our own salvation with fear and trembling. Mere hurry and bustle do not advance the work of soul-purification. We shall be judged, not according to our activity, but according to the faithfulness we have shown in following God’s directions. 19LtMs, Lt 93, 1904, par. 17

Man must co-operate with God, for He it is that “worketh in you both to will and do of His good pleasure.” [Philippians 2:13.] Remember the words spoken to Zerubbabel, “Not by might, nor by power, but by My Spirit, saith the Lord of hosts.” [Zechariah 4:6.] 19LtMs, Lt 93, 1904, par. 18

“Then answered I, and said unto him, What are these two olive trees upon the right side of the candlestick and upon the left side thereof? And I answered again, and said unto him, What be these two olive branches which through the two golden pipes empty the golden oil out of themselves? And he answered me and said, Knowest thou not what these be? And I said, No, my Lord. Then said he, These are the two anointed ones, that stand by the Lord of the whole earth.” [Verses 11-14.] 19LtMs, Lt 93, 1904, par. 19

Well, I had no idea that I could write so much. I must stop now, with just a few more words about our going to Washington. Willie, I cannot spend time moving from place to place. And besides taking time, this unfits me for work. 19LtMs, Lt 93, 1904, par. 20

I am very favorably situated for my work. I have excellent helpers who earnestly co-operate with me in the work of the Lord. I think of the books that ought now to be in circulation, and are not yet prepared. If I can keep my peace of mind and heart, I can write, I can write much valuable instruction. The books that ought to have been prepared long ago can be prepared. 19LtMs, Lt 93, 1904, par. 21

I might have had more books prepared by this time, had I not tried to help so much in other lines. The Lord has wrought through me, but church members, ministers, and physicians, and others in responsible places have made my work much harder. By their unsanctified will and unsanctified ways they have hurt themselves and me. Their condition, unsanctified and disbelieving, makes me so sad that I cannot rest. The churches have not heeded the Word of the Lord, and the work that might have been done is not done. 19LtMs, Lt 93, 1904, par. 22

At my age, I must take time to rest. I must not be kept continually in affliction of soul over those who are not helped by the messages that God sends. Because they do not heed these messages, they are in a worse condition than if the message had never come to them. The Lord’s Spirit is resisted, and disbelief is cherished. They think and talk unbelief, and grow more and more like those spoken of in the message to the Laodicean church. They profess much, yet their works deny their profession. 19LtMs, Lt 93, 1904, par. 23

Last night I slept only three hours, from eight to eleven. O how my soul longs to see the people of God zealous in repentance. I entreat them to prepare to meet their God. Can they not see in the rapid growth of trades-unions the fulfilling of the signs of the times? Those forming the labor unions are determined to have their own way. Violence and death mean nothing to them if their unions are opposed. The Spirit is working in those who profess to believe the truth, but who, because they do not live the truth, are always in contention. 19LtMs, Lt 93, 1904, par. 24

The judgments of God are in the land. The wars and rumors of wars, the destruction by fire and flood, say clearly that the time of trouble which is to increase until the end is already in the world. 19LtMs, Lt 93, 1904, par. 25