Letters and Manuscripts — Volume 15 (1900)

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Lt 6, 1900

Tenney, Brother and Sister [G. C.]

Sanitarium Farm, Thornleigh, New South Wales, Australia

January 4, 1900

Previously unpublished.

Dear Brother and Sister Tenney:

I received your letter last evening. I thank you for writing promptly, and I will write just as promptly. Why I wrote in regard to Sister Cozens was that Brother Lacey had written to me asking me to let them know by return mail if I could help Sister Cozens through next term of school. I waited to consult with W. C. White, who was away at the time. We had had some conversation together in reference to Sister Cozens, and I wanted to give her the best chance possible. I now say, if she can connect with your work satisfactorily, this may be the best thing for her. We have no special need of a girl just now. I wrote because I thought she would be waiting in suspense. I am sure that if she could be connected with the work in Brisbane, it will give her one of the better chances. 15LtMs, Lt 6, 1900, par. 1

In regard to Brother Lacey, we would say, by all means let him labor in the vicinity of Toowoomba. We know the work will need the help Brother and Sister Lacey can give. We would be pleased to have them in Maitland, for we are having close, hard work there in pressing against the influence of the denominational churches. The ministers will do all in their power to hold every member. But diligent work is being done, and we know if God is back of the workers something must move ere long. Precious souls will be called to a decision. 15LtMs, Lt 6, 1900, par. 2

I was obliged to make a change in my work, for I was threatened with complete prostration. By the blessing of the Lord I shall now avoid this. I shall spend perhaps two weeks here on the farm, and then return home to continue my writing. The book on the parables is not yet completed. One chapter more, and then it will be finished. 15LtMs, Lt 6, 1900, par. 3

I am very much pleased with the sanitarium farm. When we first thought of purchasing, I was surprised that not one dissenting word was spoken by anyone. The fruit orchard supplies all the fruit needed for the sanitarium table at Summer Hill, as well as much for canning. It has also sent to Cooranbong a large quantity of fruit at market prices. The orchard is now yielding a great many apples, mostly the small red apple, which are excellent for cooking. I wish we could get a box to you. If we should send you apples or any other fruit, would we have to pay duty on them? The trees are still loaded with fruit. This is rather small in growth, for the trees have not been properly cared for. The old wood needs cutting away, and the fruit-bearing branches need pruning. 15LtMs, Lt 6, 1900, par. 4

The object lessons are before us, teaching us valuable lessons, unfolding to us spiritual truth. I have felt sometimes, when my husband was using the knife upon the vines, that he was spoiling them, and I would plead for the vines. I see this thing in an altogether different light now. The Lord has closely connected the spiritual life of man with the plant life, which symbolizes the spiritual experience of all who are seeking to become members of the heavenly family, plants in the Lord’s garden. Our lives would be spoiled did not the Lord’s pruning knife cut away the objectionable branches, and prune the fruit-bearing branches, that we might bear fruit of a better quality. 15LtMs, Lt 6, 1900, par. 5

In love. 15LtMs, Lt 6, 1900, par. 6