Letters and Manuscripts — Volume 3

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Lt 39, 1880

[White, W. C.; White, Mary]

Waterville, Maine

August 19, 1880

Portions of this letter are published in 5MR 57-58.

Dear Children:

I have not written you, for I have been too sick to write at all. Write me just how much you have on hand of articles of Controversy, Volume One, for Signs. 3LtMs, Lt 39, 1880, par. 1

I am now for the first time writing some things for the Signs in reference to Moses’ sin in striking the rock. This is an important subject. Shall do what I can with it. Then shall send to Marian [Davis] to complete, hoping it will reach you all prepared to print, in hands of printer. 3LtMs, Lt 39, 1880, par. 2

We reached Battle Creek Wednesday noon. Took dinner and packed up and left on eight o’clock train. Reached Jackson about ten. Stopped at Brother Palmer’s all night. Early next morning were on our way to Alma. Had to wait for train to Saginaw, six hours. Arrived at Alma near dark. The same night I spoke with considerable freedom. Spoke in morning meeting and in eight o’clock meeting, Friday morn, and in afternoon at length. I felt very free in the Lord. There was scarcely any one at the meeting that I knew. All were strangers with the exception of a few. 3LtMs, Lt 39, 1880, par. 3

I spoke Sabbath morn in Sabbath school and in the afternoon at length. Called them forward. We had a very thorough move. Seventeen started to serve God for the first time. This meeting was one of deep feeling. We dismissed the congregation at five o’clock and assembled in one hour again and continued the meeting until after sundown. That night I awoke with severe cold. It came upon me very violently, but I thought it would not do to disappoint the crowd, and I made an extra effort to speak Sunday afternoon. The Lord helped me, but soon after meeting had closed, I was taken with chills. I had foot bath, sitz bath, and I was sick with high fever all night—“Out of my mind,” they said. Was sick all day Monday. Tuesday morning, sick as I was, rode to cars, but was unable to sit up. It was the most suffering day I had experienced for years. 3LtMs, Lt 39, 1880, par. 4

Arrived at Battle Creek about noon, then commenced to prepare or have others prepare for journey to Canada. Could get no one to go with me and Father and I went alone. I had not been able to eat anything from Sunday noon until Tuesday noon, and then only a very little. The journey on Grand Trunk was much easier than anticipated. We arrived at Montreal about eleven o’clock, stopped at [a] hotel that night. Next day at about noon arrived at Sherbrook. We here took the stage for Magog, sixteen miles. O, what a barren, rocky country. Poverty, poverty reigning everywhere. We reached the campground about two hours before sundown. 3LtMs, Lt 39, 1880, par. 5

The meeting was small, about one hundred tents on the ground. There is excellent material here and we think a good work can be done with proper efforts put forth. Nearly all are poor who have embraced the truth. 3LtMs, Lt 39, 1880, par. 6

I spoke Sabbath afternoon and Sunday to a large crowd that came from Waterloo on special trains and also on boats. I had great freedom in speaking to the people, and all seemed to be highly gratified. There had been a strong effort made to pass the prohibition law, but [it] failed. Their head man said, “If Mrs. White could have spoken in the cities, when a few weeks ago the question was agitated, they would have carried the day.” They said they never heard anything by any speaker equal [to] that discourse on temperance. 3LtMs, Lt 39, 1880, par. 7

The Bourdeaus say that a great victory has been gained to them in Canada in favor of the truth. Had we not attended their camp meeting, it would have been a fearful discouragement upon the cause and work in Canada. I never saw a people so grateful for our labors as in this place. 3LtMs, Lt 39, 1880, par. 8

Tuesday morning we rode in stage sixteen miles to Sherbrook, took cars for Portland. I was sick all day, but my cold is better now. Father is now having this cold and is almost used up. 3LtMs, Lt 39, 1880, par. 9

We reached Waterville [Maine] Wednesday noon. This gives me a little time to write, but my poor head forbids my doing much. 3LtMs, Lt 39, 1880, par. 10

We think our Canada meeting was a very important one. 3LtMs, Lt 39, 1880, par. 11

We are sorry Willie is so bad. I do not think [it] will last long. Write often. I will do better than I have done, if I can only get well once more. 3LtMs, Lt 39, 1880, par. 12

Mother.

P.S. No special news to write. Father and I are alone, but doing very well. We obtain half-fare tickets to Portland. Twenty-two dollars for both on Grand Trunk line. Send me nothing in line of clothing or anything till I send for you to do so. I cannot write particulars about matters here till I can write more understandingly. 3LtMs, Lt 39, 1880, par. 13

Mother.