The Advent Review and Sabbath Herald, vol. 76

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The Advent Review and Sabbath Herald, Vol. 76

1899

January 3, 1899

“Editorial” The Advent Review and Sabbath Herald 76, 1, p. 8.

FAITH is the expecting the word of God itself to do what that word says, and depending upon that word itself to do what the word says. ARSH January 3, 1899, page 8.1

When this is clearly discerned, it is perfectly easy to see how it is that “faith is the substance of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen.” ARSH January 3, 1899, page 8.2

Since the word of God is imbued with creative power, and so is able to produce in every substance the thing which that word speaks; and since faith is the expectation that the word itself will do what the word says, and depending on “the word only” to do what that word says, it is plain enough that faith is the substance of things hoped for. ARSH January 3, 1899, page 8.3

Since the word of God is in itself creative, and so is able to produce and cause to appear what otherwise would never exist nor be seen; and since faith is the expecting the word of God only to do just that thing, and depending upon “the word only” to do it, it is plan enough that faith is “the evidence of things not seen.” ARSH January 3, 1899, page 8.4

Thus it is that “through faithwe understand that the worlds were framed by the word of God, so that things which are seen were not made of things which do appear.” ARSH January 3, 1899, page 8.5

He who exercises faith knows that the word of God is creative, and that so it is able to produce the thing spoken. Therefore he can understand, not guess, that the worlds were produced, were caused to exist, by the word of God. ARSH January 3, 1899, page 8.6

He who exercises faith can understand that though before the word of God was spoken, neither the things which are now seen nor the substances of which those things are composed, anywhere appeared, simply because they did not exist; yet when that word was spoken, the worlds were, simply because that word itself caused them to exist. ARSH January 3, 1899, page 8.7

This is the difference between the word of God and the word of man. Man may speak; but there is no power in his words to perform the thing spoken: if the thing is to be accomplished which he has spoken, the man must dosomething in addition to speaking the word—he must make good his word. ARSH January 3, 1899, page 8.8

Not so the word of God. ARSH January 3, 1899, page 8.9

When God speaks, the thing is. And it is, simply because he has spoken. It accomplishes that which he was pleased to speak. It is not necessary that the Lord, as man, must do something in addition to make his word good: it is good. He speaks “the word only,” and the thing is accomplished. ARSH January 3, 1899, page 8.10

And so it is written: “For this cause also thank we God without ceasing, because, when ye received the word of God, which ye heard of us, ye received it not as the word of men, but as it is in truth, the word of God, whicheffectually worketh also in you that believe”—in you that exercise faith. 1 Thessalonians 2:13. ARSH January 3, 1899, page 8.11

This also is how it is that it is “impossible for God to lie.” It is not impossible for God to lie only because he will not, but also because he can not. And he can not lie, just because he can not: it is impossible. And it is impossible, because when he speaks, the creative energy is in the word spoken; so that “the word only” causes the thing to be so. ARSH January 3, 1899, page 8.12

Man may speak a word, and it not be so. Thus man can lie; for to speak what is not so, is to lie. And man can lie, can speak what is not so, because there is no power in his word itself to cause the thing to be. With God this is impossible: he can not lie; for “he spake, and it was;” he speaks, and it is so. ARSH January 3, 1899, page 8.13

This is also how it is that when the word of God is spoken for a certain time, as in a prophecy for hundreds of years to come, when that time actually has arrived, that word is fulfilled. And it is then fulfilled, not because, apart from the word, God does something to fulfil it; but because the word was spoken for that time, and in it is the creative energy which causes the word at that time to produce the thing spoken. ARSH January 3, 1899, page 8.14

This is how it was that if the children had not cried, “Hosanna to the Son of God,” the stones would have immediately cried out; and this is how it was that when the third day had come, it was “impossible” that he should be any longer holden of death. ARSH January 3, 1899, page 8.15

O, the word of God is divine! In it is creative energy. It is “living and powerful.” The word of God is self-fulfilling; and to trust it and depend upon it, as such, thatis to exercise faith. “Hast thou faith?” ARSH January 3, 1899, page 8.16

“Editorial Note” The Advent Review and Sabbath Herald 76, 1, p. 8.

WHEN people receive the Spirit of God when they are baptized with the Holy Ghost, they are by him baptized into divine unity,—the unity for which Jesus prayed. ARSH January 3, 1899, page 8.1

“For by one Spirit are we all baptized into one body, whether we be Jews or Gentiles, whether we be bone or free; and have been all made to drink into one Spirit.” ARSH January 3, 1899, page 8.2

And this unity is one of both individual and mutual helpfulness and dependence. ARSH January 3, 1899, page 8.3

It is the unity of individual and mutual helpfulness; because the Holy Spirit is given alone to fit us for service. And so it is written: “The Spirit of the Lord God is upon me; because the Lord hath anointed me to preach good tidings unto the meek, he hath sent me to bind up the broken-hearted, to proclaim liberty to the captives, and the opening of the prison to them that are bound.” Isaiah 61:1. And, “God anointed Jesus of Nazareth with the Holy Ghost and with power: who went about doing good, and healing all that were oppressed of the devil; for God was with him.” Acts 10:38. ARSH January 3, 1899, page 8.4

It is also the unity of individual and mutual dependence; because the gifts of the Spirit are many, and are divided “to every man severally as he will.” 1 Corinthians 12:11. These gifts are given “for the edifying of the body of Christ,” “which is the church.” Each gift is essential to the church. But as no one person has all the gifts, each one is dependent upon all the others for the benefits which each gift imparts to the church. ARSH January 3, 1899, page 8.5

Therefore it is written: “God hath set the members every one of them in the body, as it hath pleased him. And if they were all one member, where were the body? But now are they many members, yet but one body. And the eye cannot say unto the hand, I have no need of thee: nor again the head to the feet, I have no need of you. Nay, much more those members of the body, which seem to be more feeble, are necessary: and those members of the body, which we think to be less honorable, upon these we bestow more abundant honor; and our uncomely parts have more abundant comeliness.” 1 Corinthians 12:18-23. ARSH January 3, 1899, page 8.6

Just as the human body is composed of many members, and each member in its place is essential to the symmetry of the body; and just as each member of the human body, however small and feeble, or however great and strong, is dependent on every other member of the body, in order to the proper action of the body as God designed it; so is the body of Christ—the church. And as under “the inspiration of the Almighty,” there is a divine unity in the human body, so under the baptism of the Holy Ghost, the inspiration of the Almighty, there is divine unity in the body of Christ, which is the church. ARSH January 3, 1899, page 8.7

Under the reign of the Holy Spirit, no member of the church can say of another, “I have no need of him;” even the Head can not say to the feet, “I have no need of you.” How much less, then, can any member of the body say to another member, “I have no need of thee.” For “God hath tempered the body together, having given more abundant honor to that part which lacked: that there should be no schism in the body; but that the members should have the same care one for another. And whether one member suffer, all the members suffer with it; or one member be honored, all the members rejoice with it.” 1 Corinthians 12:24-26. ARSH January 3, 1899, page 8.8

“Now ye are the body of Christ, and members in particular.” Verse 27. And Christ is now baptizing his people with the Holy Ghost into this divine unity of the church of Christ. Thank the Lord! Are you baptized into this divine unity? or is there division where you are? Is Christ divided?—No, no! “By one Spirit are we all baptized into one body,” as certainly as we are baptized with the Spirit at all. Are you baptized with the Holy Ghost? ARSH January 3, 1899, page 8.9

“Ask, and it shall be given you.” “Receive ye the Holy Ghost.” “Be filled with” “the Holy Spirit of God, whereby ye are sealed unto the day of redemption.” ARSH January 3, 1899, page 8.10

“Editorial Notes” The Advent Review and Sabbath Herald 76, 1, pp. 8, 9.

THE simple story of the cross is not hard to understand. It is so plain that a wayfaring man, though a fool, may comprehend it. The A B C of the Christian religion is easy to learn, and here it is:— ARSH January 3, 1899, page 8.1

A.—“All have sinned, and come short of the glory of God.” ARSH January 3, 1899, page 8.2

B.—“Behold the Lamb of God, which taketh away the sin of the world.” ARSH January 3, 1899, page 8.3

C.—“Come unto me, ... and I will give you rest.” ARSH January 3, 1899, page 8.4

WE should make all the allowance in the world for the mistakes of others; but we should make no excuse nor allowance for anything in ourselves that is a hair’s-breadth short of perfection as it is in Christ Jesus. When we recognize only this standard, and hold ourselves uncompromisingly to it, all the instrumentalities of heaven and earth which God controls are enlisted to bring us fully to that point. And just as soon as we are perfected in him, then he can and will put his seal upon us, and we shall be secure, even when a thousand fall at our side and ten thousand at our right hand. ARSH January 3, 1899, page 8.5

“Editorial Bits” The Advent Review and Sabbath Herald 76, 1, p. 9.

PRESIDENT MCKINLEY has selected Archbishop Ireland “to represent the United States at the czar’s peace congress;” and “the archbishop has agreed to accept this most important and honorable post.” Such is the substance of a special dispatch from New York, published in the Chicago Tribune, Dec. 26, 1898. ARSH January 3, 1899, page 9.1

The dispatch then goes on to say that “ever since his induction into office, the President has been anxious to testify his appreciation of Archbishop Ireland’s republicanism, ... and of his mental gifts and learning;” and “the czar’s call for an international peace congress... has presented an exceptional opportunity to honor Archbishop Ireland in an illustrious manner.” ARSH January 3, 1899, page 9.2

Further, it says: “As the representative of the United States in such an assemblage, his position would comport with the dignity of his ecclesiastical office;” and, “Aside from the pleasant effect that such a designation would have upon a large proportion of the population of this country, it is assumed that the United States would gain prestige among the Catholic nations represented at this congress, as well as achieve for the President a reputation for good taste in selecting for a peaceful mission a professional messenger of peace and good will.” ARSH January 3, 1899, page 9.3

And though “it is not yet known whether the archbishop will be the sole representative of the United States, or whether he will head a delegation of three or five representatives from this country,” yet as certainly as it shall turn out true that Archbishop Ireland, whether alone or as the head of a delegation, really goes to that congress as the representative of the United States, it will then and forever after be claimed and maintained that he is the representative of the religion of the United States; that the Catholic religion is the religion of the United States; and that therefore the United States is truly a Catholic Christian nation. ARSH January 3, 1899, page 9.4

Archbishop Ireland’s “warm personal friendship” for President McKinley is proving an exceedingly profitable investment for the Catholic Church. ARSH January 3, 1899, page 9.5