Selected Messages Book 3

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Chapter 12—Literary Assistants in Work of Ellen G. White

James White and Others Assisted—While my husband lived, he acted as a helper and counselor in the sending out of the messages that were given to me. We traveled extensively. Sometimes light would be given to me in the night season, sometimes in the daytime before large congregations. The instruction I received in vision was faithfully written out by me, as I had time and strength for the work. Afterward we examined the matter together, my husband correcting grammatical errors and eliminating needless repetition. Then it was carefully copied for the persons addressed, or for the printer. 3SM 89.1

As the work grew, others assisted me in the preparation of matter for publication. After my husband's death, faithful helpers joined me, who labored untiringly in the work of copying the testimonies and preparing articles for publication. 3SM 89.2

But the reports that are circulated, that any of my helpers are permitted to add matter or change the meaning of the messages I write out, are not true.—Letter 225, 1906, published in 1913 in Writing and Sending Out of the Testimonies for the Church, p. 4. (Selected Messages 1:50.) 3SM 89.3

E. G. White Feeling of Inadequacy in 1873— This morning I take into candid consideration my writings. My husband is too feeble to help me prepare them for the printer, therefore I shall do no more with them at present. I am not a scholar. I cannot prepare my own writings for the press. Until I can do this I shall write no more. It is not my duty to tax others with my manuscript.—Manuscript 3, 1873 (Diary January 10, 1873.) 3SM 89.4

Determined to Develop Her Literary Skills—We rested well last night. This Sabbath morning opens cloudy. My mind is coming to strange conclusions. I am thinking I must lay aside my writing I have taken so much pleasure in, and see if I cannot become a scholar. I am not a grammarian. I will try, if the Lord will help me, at forty-five years old to become a scholar in the science. God will help me. I believe He will.—Manuscript 3, 1873 (Diary January 11, 1873.) 3SM 90.1

Sense of Inadequacy in 1894—Now I must leave this subject so imperfectly presented that I fear you will misinterpret that which I feel so anxious to make plain. Oh, that God would quicken the understanding, for I am but a poor writer, and cannot with pen or voice express the great and deep mysteries of God. Oh, pray for yourselves, pray for me.—Letter 67, 1894. 3SM 90.2

Refuting Reports of Changes in the Writings—My copyists you have seen. They do not change my language. It stands as I write it.... 3SM 90.3

My work has been in the field since 1845. Ever since then I have labored with pen and voice. Increased light has come to me as I have imparted the light given me. I have very much more light on the Old and New Testament Scriptures, which I shall present to our people.—Letter 61a, 1900. 3SM 90.4

Final Reading of All Writings Published and Unpublished—I am still as active as ever. I am not in the least decrepit. I am able to do much work, writing and speaking as I did years ago. 3SM 90.5

I read over all that is copied, to see that everything is as it should be. I read all the book manuscript before it is sent to the printer. So you can see that my time must be fully occupied. Besides writing, I am called upon to speak to the different churches and to attend important meetings. I could not do this work unless the Lord helped me.—Letter 133, 1902. 3SM 90.6